How Daylight Saving Time Is Out of Sync With Nature


 
Tonight is the night when we all need to reset our clocks to “spring forward” one hour for Daylight Saving Time.

But I don’t think this is a good idea.

What I don’t like about it is that it takes us off the natural order of time. It’s a man-made convention.

To make matters worse, this past week a group of bipartisan senators reintroduced a the Sunshine Protection Act that would make “enjoying Daylight Savings Time” a year-round occurrence. The bill has already passed on the state level in Florida (2018) California (2018) and Washington (2019) but requires change at the federal level to go into effect.
 


Circadian Rhythm: How An Inner Clock Connects Your Body With the Cosmos


 
It may seem like we are individual bodies wandering randomly through our earthly environment, but in fact, our bodies are closely regulated by an inner clock taking cues from the cosmos.

The results of this cosmic connection are “circadian rhythms,” the 24-hour cycle of biological processes that have been widely observed in plants, animals, fungi, and even cyanobacteria.

This natural, internal process regulates the sleep–wake cycle and repeats on each rotation of the Earth roughly every 24 hours. It synchronizes the body of the organism with the daily cycle of the sun and can refer to any of the 24-hour rhythms that are driven by the circadian clock.
 


An Introduction to Natural Time


 
When I first became interested in orienting my life to Nature back in 1987, the first thing I started learning about was natural time.

In our industrial consumer material world we are oriented to clocks and calendars that are part of the industrial system. In the material world time is divided into standardized lengths—each minute has 60 second, each hour has 60 minutes, each day has 24 hours, each week has 7 days…

But in Nature, time is determined by the movement of the sun, the moon, and the stars, which are not so standard, but are actually what is occurring in life.
 


In Its Own Time

For the past month or so I have been on a mission to write a book…

I didn’t think it would take long but as I began to write, I had more and more insights about what I wanted to say, until it eventually became a 75-page ebook, which is about 150 pages if it were a 6×9 print book.

Of course, days and weeks are going by …

What I learned from this was that creative work takes its own time…


Why I Stay With Analog Clocks

A reader sent me a piece from The New York Times Magazine, published a few weeks ago, about analog clocks.

Right at the beginning, the writer said that her younger sister (by only ten years) did not know how to read an analog clock! “No doubt that skill is disappearing from the populace,” she said, “Along with an avalanche of others: driving a stick shift, writing by hand, navigating by memory, using stamps.”

And then the next paragraph was devoted entirely to instructions for reading an analog clock.

 


The Dawn of a New Day


 
I often wake up at various times between midnight and 6am with thoughts I want to write down. For this reason I usually keep my journal and next to my bed, or as a backup a pad or two of paper in case I left my journal in my office.

Sometimes I am simply writing what happened the day before, in which case I date the page for the previous day and catch up on whatever happened and my comments during the darkness between the days.

But other times I want to write down something that has just occurred to me, and I’ve been confused as to whether the proper date is yesterday or tomorrow.